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1932 Panther Motorcycle Twin Port Red Wing

£ 6,800

Reference
27666
Height
91.5 cm (36")
Width
201 cm (79 1/4")
Depth
76.5 cm (30")
1932 Phelon & Moore Panther Motorcycle.
A rare 1932 rigid framed "sloper" 250cc Panther motorcycle. The last owner acquired the bike in 1983. It is a simple and robust machine which inspires enormous enthusiasm from its owners. It is a great starting single with twin port high exhausts, girder forks, 3 speed with a single sprung seat. The bike has been refurbished in the past with a good green paint finish, new magneto, wheels with excellent chrome rims and stainless steel spokes. The tank with decals, "Redwing, 70" on the top and "Panther" on the sides. A great looking classic British Motorcycle.
This bike has had some upgrades some time ago. We believe is has been upgraded from a singe port to a twin port engine. The gearbox is a 3 speed which needs a little attention as the gear sometimes gets stuck if left in 1st after stopping. The engine number is 2001 which I believe it means number 1 engine.


Taken from wikipedia
Phelon & Moore manufactured motorcycles in Cleckheaton, Yorkshire, England from 1904 to 1967 particularly those under the Panther marquee. They became identified with one particular design of motorcycle which had a large sloping 40-degree single-cylinder engine as a stressed member of the frame. This design spanned the entire history of the company, starting with a 500cc model and ending with a 645cc model.
The sloping stressed member concept was patented in 1900 by Joah ("John") Carver Phelon and his nephew Harry Rayner. Phelon & Rayner made the first chain-driven motorcycle in 1900. They could not afford to put their first bike into production, so sold the design to Humber for royalties, and that design was produced by Humber till 1907. After Harry Rayner died in a car accident, Joah Phelon went into partnership with Richard Moore.
The first Panther was launched in 1924, but the Phelon & Moore name was not dropped until somewhere around 1929.
In 1932 the Panther Model 100, an OHV 600cc single, was launched and this was produced through to the sixties, ending its run as the 645cc Panther Model 120 of 1967. This line of Panthers was the most famous of all Phelon & Moore models.

Phelon & Moore also produced a range of lightweight machines, also generally carrying the name Panther or Red Panther, using their own four-stroke single engines and Villiers two-stroke engines. The Red Panther was famous for being the cheapest complete bike available in the thirties, priced at a fraction under £30. In 1934 a 250cc Red Panther won the Maudes Trophy.
The early post-war models (both Lightweight and Heavyweight) were fitted with air/oil damped Dowty "Oleomatic" telescopic forks.
During the scooter boom of the late 1950s, P & M imported a scooter (Scooterrot) and moped from French manufacturer Terrot, which were plagued with troubles. This gave P & M the chance to develop their own scooter, the Panther Princess, but this was not a success and helped bring about the demise of P & M as motorcycle manufacturers. In 1962 the receiver was called in, and production staggered on until 1966.
Height
91.5 cm (36")
Width
201 cm (79 1/4")
Depth
76.5 cm (30")
Condition
Very good and ridable. Starts great.
Year
1932
Period
1900-1949
exhibition
xmas.19
Country
United Kingdom